Local Health Integration Network
Text size:


QuickLinks

CentralWestHealthLine.com

physio button new

Health Links

Residents First Small Logo

healthy c

HC logo 1

Wait Times

Twitter

 

 

Frequently Asked Questions

The following provides answers to some of the most frequently asked questions we receive about Local Health Integration Networks (LHINs), about the Central West LHIN, and about the Integrated Health Service Plan (IHSP). If there is a question you can’t find an answer to on our website, and you would like to see added to this area, please e-mail it to centralwest@lhins.on.ca.

ABOUT LOCAL HEALTH INTEGRATION NETWORKS (LHINs)

1. What is a Local Health Integration Network (LHIN)?
2. Why is the government organizing the health system by LHINs?
3. How many LHINs are there?
4. What programs/services is the Ministry of Health & Long-Term Care still responsible for?
5. Will LHINs be governed by the Ministry of Health & Long-Term Care?
6. Do LHINs provide direct health care services to the community?
7. How do the LHINs determine the health care priorities within their region?
8. How do LHINs make health care better in communities across Ontario?

ABOUT THE CENTRAL WEST LHIN

1. What communities does the Central West LHIN cover?
2. How many health service organizations have been assigned to the Central West LHIN?
3. What was the founding principle for the Central West LHIN?
4. Why has the government formed the Central West LHIN?
5. What is the Central West LHIN’s vision?
6. What values guide the activities of the Central West LHIN?
7. On what principles will the Central West LHIN health system be built?
8. What is the estimated population of the Central West LHIN?
9. Approximately what percentage of the Central West LHIN is visible minority?

ABOUT THE INTEGRATED HEALTH SERVICE PLAN (IHSP)

1. What is an Integrated Health Service Plan (IHSP)?
2. How was the IHSP developed?
3. What are the top priorities identified in the IHSP?
4. Is there still any possibility to provide further input into the IHSP?
5. What are the Central West LHIN’s next steps in addressing the priorities outlined in the IHSP?

ABOUT LOCAL HEALTH INTEGRATION NETWORKS (LHINs)

1. What is a Local Health Integration Network (LHIN)?

A. Local Health Integration Networks (LHINs) are crown agencies established by the Government of Ontario to plan, coordinate, integrate and fund health services at a local level including:
• Hospitals
• Community Health Centres
• Long-Term Care Homes
• mental health and addiction agencies
• community support service agencies; and
• Community Care Access Centres.

LHINs are based on a principle that community-based care is best planned, coordinated and funded in an integrated manner at the community level, because local people are best able to determine their health service needs and priorities.

2. Why is the government organizing the health system by LHINs?

A. The government is transforming the health system to make it more patient-centre, efficient and accountable. LHINs are a key component of that plan. By improving the integration and coordination of services at a local level, LHINs will help ensure that Ontarians receive the care they need now and in the future.

3. How many LHINs are there?

A. Fourteen LHINs have been established across the province: Central, Central East, Central West, Champlain, Erie St. Clair, Hamilton Niagara Haldimand Brant, Mississauga Halton, North Simcoe Muskoka, North East, North West, South East, South West, Toronto Central, and Waterloo Wellington.

4. What programs/services is the Ministry of Health & Long-Term Care still responsible for?

A. The Ministry of Health & Long-Term Care retains accountability for:
• individual practitioners
• family health teams
• ambulance services
• laboratories
• provincial drug programs
• provincial programs
• independent health facilities
• public health

5. Will LHINs be governed by the Ministry of Health & Long-Term Care?

A. No. Each LHIN is governed by its own Board of Directors who have been appointed by the Province.

6. Do LHINs provide direct health care services to the community?

A. No. The LHINs are strictly involved in planning, integrating and funding local health services in the community.

7. How do the LHINs determine the health care priorities within their region?

A. LHINs are working closely with local residents and health service providers in their respective communities to identify their health care needs and priorities through community engagement activities. They are developing ways to improve access to services, respond to concerns people have about those services and look for ways for health service providers to improve the quality of care.

8. How do LHINs make health care better in communities across Ontario?

A. LHINs are responsible for the local health system to ensure that services are integrated and coordinated. Over time, this will ease the flow of patients across the health care system and improve access to services in communities. They are also expected to plan and allocate resources more efficiently to ensure better access to health care now and in the future.

In general, LHINs allow for more community input into local health care decisions, which improves the health care experience for patients in every part of the province.

ABOUT THE CENTRAL WEST LHIN

1. What communities does the Central West LHIN cover?

A. The Central West LHIN encompasses all of Dufferin County, the northern portion of Peel Region, parts of north-western Toronto, and south-west York Region. It includes Bolton, Brampton, Caledon, Dufferin County, Malton, Orangeville, Rexdale, Shelburne and Woodbridge.

2. How many health service organizations have been assigned to the Central West LHIN? 

A. Based on their organization’s address, 49 health service providers have been assigned to the Central West LHIN.

3. What was the founding principle for the Central West LHIN?

A. The Central West LHIN was founded on the principle that local health care is best planned and funded in a coordinated way locally, because local people best know their own health service needs and priorities.

4. Why has the government formed the Central West LHIN?

A. The Central West LHIN will listen and respond to both community members and health services providers, and with them will create a more efficient and accountable health care system that ensures people get access to the care they need.

5. What is the Central West LHIN’s vision?

A. The Central West LHIN will work to create ‘a local health system that helps people stay healthy, delivers good care when they need it, and will be there for their children and grandchildren’.

6. What values guide the activities of the Central West LHIN?

A. The Central West LHIN will conduct its activities based on the following values:
• Person-centred
• Transparency
• Integrity
• Stewardship

7. On what principles will the Central West LHIN health system be built?

A. The Central West LHIN local health system will be built on the following five principles:
• Equitable access, based on patient/client need
• Preservation of patients’/clients’ choice
• People-centred, community-focused care that responds to local population health needs
• Measurable, results-driven outcomes based on strategic policy formulation, business planning, and information management
• Shared accountability between providers, government, community and citizens

8. What is the estimated population of the Central West LHIN?

A. It is currently estimated that the Central West LHIN population exceeds 720,000.

9. Approximately what percentage of the Central West LHIN is visible minority?

A. About 40% of the population in the Central West LHIN is visible minorities, representing the highest proportion in Ontario.

INTEGRATED HEALTH SERVICE PLAN (IHSP)

1. What is an Integrated Health Service Plan (IHSP)?

A. The Central West LHIN is required to prepare an Integrated Health Service Plan (IHSP). It sets out local health care priorities and strategies for the three-year period starting April 1, 2007. The IHSP outlines where the Central West LHIN will be focusing its attention and lays out the reasons why the Central West LHIN is taking action in these areas.

We believe that this initial plan provides the framework for planning, building and sustaining an accessible, high-quality, client-focused and responsive local health system.

2. How was the IHSP developed?

A. Through an extensive community engagement process, the Central West LHIN listened to members of the public and health service providers to ensure it understood the current circumstances and the needs and priorities of the community. The process involved facilitated discussions with community residents and health service providers, a poll of 602 households, a survey of health service organizations, and an analysis of socio-demographic and health services utilization data.

3. What are the top priorities identified in the IHSP?

A. What emerged from the IHSP development process were the following five client priority areas:
• Maternal and Child Services
• Mental Health and Addiction Services
• Palliative/End-of-Life Services
• Rehabilitation Services
• Services for Seniors

These client priorities are complemented by priorities that cut across the health care continuum and include:
• Chronic Disease Prevention and Management
• Primary Care Linkages
• Responsiveness to Cultural Diversity

4. Is there still any possibility to provide further input into the IHSP?

A. The Central West LHIN knows that community engagement is an ongoing process and that our initial 3-Year IHSP is the beginning of a plan that will have to be updated and revised to incorporate the public’s ongoing input and to respond to changing circumstances within the system.

5. What are the Central West LHIN’s next steps in addressing the priorities outlined in the IHSP?

A. The Central West LHIN has developed a comprehensive action plan to address the key priority areas outlined in the IHSP. There are a number of common features among the action steps including building on service integration initiatives that are already in place, developing inventories of existing services, establishing tools to support partnerships, and monitoring outcomes.

We will continue to work with health care organizations from across the health care spectrum, including areas that are not funded directly by the LHIN (i.e. Public Health, physician services, provincial and regional networks, disease-specific associations). We will also link with neighbouring LHINs on cross-border issues, ensuring Central West LHIN residents have access to specialized and regional programs.